The verdict is a victory for police accountability, but one conviction does not exonerate a system that too often fails Black and Brown communities

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The verdict is a victory for police accountability, but one conviction does not exonerate a system that too often fails Black and Brown communities; a system mired in racial injustice and impunity for police violence. We must re-examine law enforcement and public safety systems and challenge policies that continue to perpetuate race and class inequities. 

Activists across the country are proposing new approaches to law enforcement. One such legislative effort is the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act: the measure would, among other things, ban neck restraints, prohibit "no knock" warrants in drug cases at the federal level, reform qualified immunity, end discriminatory profiling at every level of U.S. law enforcement, mandate dashboard cameras and body cameras for federal law enforcement, and establish a National Police Misconduct Registry to prevent "problematic" officers from moving between precincts and jurisdictions. We call on legislators, judges, prosecutors, and community members to transform the public safety system to one based on transparency, accountability, and equity.   

Leonard Pitts: Real justice shouldn’t be this difficult